Saturday, 15 June 2013

Job 1-5

Here's how the study works: Read the chapters mentioned in the heading during the week and share any words, thoughts, verses that stood out to you. Having a week for several chapters creates the opportunity to revisit them and make additional comments as you feel inclined as well as make comments on other people's insights.

5 comments:

Susan said...

1:8 Then the Lord said to Satan, “Have you considered my servant Job? There is no one on earth like him; he is blameless and upright, a man who fears God and shuns evil.”

It is God who brings Job to Satan’s attention.

As the story progress we discover that Job’s motives for worshipping God are not based on God’s blessings but on God’s character. But Satan doesn’t believe this.

Susan said...

2:3 Then the Lord said to Satan, “Have you considered my servant Job? There is no one on earth like him; he is blameless and upright, a man who fears God and shuns evil. And he still maintains his integrity, though you incited me against him to ruin him without any reason.”

Again it is God who brings Job to Satan’s attention. This time God says he was the one who acted against Job to ruin him even though it was actually Satan who caused the destruction. God accepts responsibility for causing Job’s pain.

Susan said...

3:23 Why is life given to a man whose way is hidden, whom God has hedged in?

The Message puts this verse like this: What’s the point of life when it doesn’t make sense, when God blocks all the roads to meaning?

Suffering tends to make us question the meaning of life. The word for “hedged” in this verse is the same as in 1:10 where it is used to describe God’s protection. God hedges always protect us but sometimes keep us from understanding. Nevertheless hedges are always for our good so we need to trust God even when we don’t understand.

Susan said...

4:7 “Consider now: Who, being innocent, has ever perished? Where were the upright ever destroyed?

Where does this guy live? Surely even in his day the innocent perished and the upright were destroyed in floods, earthquakes etc.

Perhaps he chose not to notice. It is easier to overlook the suffering of others when we can’t explain it.

Susan said...

5:8 But if I were you, I would appeal to God; I would lay my cause before him.

While it is always a good idea to appeal to God, Eliphaz thought Job was a wilful sinner being punished but this was not the case.

From Constable’s Commentary: We should learn from this speech not to judge another person's relationship with God by what they may be experiencing, be it adversity or tranquillity.